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Conventional Insanity

glowcloud:

dailydot:

Congratulations, gamer girls—you’re officially at the top of the food chain when it comes to games. A new study released by the Entertainment Software Association has revealed that adult women now occupy the largest demographic in the gaming industry. Women over 18 made up a whopping 36 percent of the gaming population, followed by adult men at 35 percent. 

I cannot wait for men to cry about this

quickbewitty:

quickbewitty:

Why do cows have hooves instead of feet?

Because they lactose

deceptivecadenza:

John Cage (1912-1992)

Sonatas and Interludes for prepared piano (1946-48)

Sonata V 0:07
Sonata VI 1:58
Sonata VII 4:27
Sonata VIII 6:58
Second Interlude 9:53

The American composer John Cage had a seminal influence on the American avant garde and on music throughout the world. His interests in Zen Buddhism, the I Ching and in Hinduism were reflected in his innovative and experimental music in which he extended the musical vocabulary to include elements of noise and chance. 
"Sonatas and Interludes", written between 1946 and 1948, is a set of pieces for prepared piano, an instrument into which objects have been inserted - screws, bolts, plastic and rubber, to give various percussive effects. The work reflects Cages approach to the use of unusual sounds and his interest in Hinduism, with its distinction between ‘white’ and ‘black’ emotions, set around central tranquility.

Preparation for the piano:

image

al-grave:

Baby hippos are the best


That’s a Pokémon. It has to be.

al-grave:

Baby hippos are the best

That’s a Pokémon. It has to be.

Sometimes all you can do is lend a shoulder and an ear.

deceptivecadenza:

Olivier Messiaen (1908-1992)

Petites esquisses d’oiseaux (1985)

1. Le rouge gorge 0:00
2. Le merle noir 2:30
3. Le rouge gorge 4:48
4. Le grive musicienne 7:14
5. Le rouge gorge 9:35
6. L’alouette des champs 12:15

Håkan Austbø, piano

deceptivecadenza:

武満 徹  |  Tōru Takemitsu (1930-1996)

Requiem for String Orchestra (1957)

Requiem for strings (弦楽のためのレクイエム) was Toru Takemitsu’s (武満徹 1930 – 1996) early composition in 1957. It remained unknown to the world until 1958, when Igor Stravinsky visited Japan and heard Takemitsu’s composition. The music had been mistakenly selected by staff of the Japanese national broadcast station NHK as work of the Russian composer, but Stravinsky insisted on hearing it to the end and expressed admiration for the work. In a later press conference, he praised its “sincerity” and “passionate” writing[1]. Stravinsky subsequently invited the Japanese composer to lunch; Takemitsu later described it as an “unforgettable” experience[2].

Composed as a tribute to his mentor, composer Fumio Hayasaka (早坂文雄 1914 – 1955), Requiem for strings shows the composer’s avant-garde style of composition which absorbs elements of various forms of music (namely Schoenberg, Berg, and Webern’s Second Viennese School[3]); with great resemblance to Western classical music. Requiem also shows a highly ‘non-Japanese’ commotion that audiences may find difficult to relate to anything Japanese.

deceptivecadenza:

武満 徹  |  Tōru Takemitsu (1930-1996)

Nostalghia for violin and string orchestra (1987)

Yuri Bashmet, violin 
Moscow Soloists directed by Roman Balashov